What I Write/Why I Write

I wonder why my words
Never seem to stay
Exactly how I mean them
But change from day to day.

I write what I feel
Deep down inside of me,
Using my pen
Setting my emotions free.

I write what I see
In the world around
People I meet
Their stories abound.

I write to remember
Feelings I’ve felt,
Struggling to record
Hands that I’ve been dealt.

I write to fascinate
To evoke emotion,
I write to create:
Express fantastic notions.

I write to reveal
The deepest part of me
Thoughts, dreams, ideals
Helping others see.

I offer only insights
To try and leave you thoughtful
And perhaps to shed some light
Upon this darkening world.

And so, dear reader,
I give my words to you
Do with them what you will
Be harsh not in your view.

~ jenelle

NAMES

One of the most frequently asked questions I come up against as an author is: “How do you come up with names for your characters?”

There are a number of factors that have to come into consideration for a character’s name.

First of all is the question of meaning. I like for a character’s name to have some sort of meaning that correlates to something in that character’s personality. I have two invaluable resources for coming up with names, an old, battered baby name book, and the babynamesworld website. Second, there is the sound of the name.Third is spelling, fantasy characters can’t be named mundane things such as “Bill” or “George”… however, a mundane-seeming name can be spiced up merely by re-thinking the spelling; thus, “George” becomes “Jorge”, “Jeff” becomes “Geoff”, etc. If I don’t like the way one name looks or sounds, I might even combine two or more names to create something new. For example, I liked both “Katrina” and “Katelyn”, but neither one seemed quite right for a character. I combined the two and voila! “Kaitryn” was born. If the character is a dragon or some other fantasy creature, the names become easier because I can just make them up. These names tend to pop into my head quite easily for some reason. Dragons need strong sounding names with lots of syllables. Gryphons have beaks and therefore their names need to have lots of hard sounds and few liquid sounds. Their names are more abrupt and tend to end with a “k” sound. Unicorns and Pegasus need names that roll off the tongue with lots of “l’s”, “w’s” and “r’s”.

For countries and other things that need to be named, or in times of great frustration, I tend to swipe my fingers across the keyboard several times and then search the results for any interesting sounds that could be the beginning of an idea for a name: thus were “seheowks” named. The benefit to this method is that if no interesting ideas spring to life from the haphazard assortment of letters that come up on the screen, at the very least I get the satisfaction of whacking on the keyboard for a while. :-)

~ jenelle

HOW IT ALL BEGAN

Let me tell you the story of how I was encouraged to begin the writing adventure that has become the Tellurae Aquaous Series:

I have been a lover of books my whole life. It started when I was just a baby and my mom read the entire “Little House on the Prairie” series to me. It continued with such titles as “The Chronicles of Narnia,” “A Wrinkle in Time,” “The Hobbit,” “The Lord of the Rings,” “The Cooper Family Adventures,” “Hank the Cowdog,” “The Wind in the Willows,” “Lad: A Dog,” and many more as my father made it a habit to read out loud to my siblings and me each night before bed. It continued as I astounded some of my high school teachers with the speed at which I devoured books they gave me. In high school I turned from the Young Adult section and found the Star Wars books, the Wheel of Time books, The Deathgate Cycle, and more. It continued to develop into a love for writing as I took every creative writing class they offered in high school and college, and it came to fruition when my dad proposed a challenge to me one summer: (more…)

~ jenelle